The Right Decision

Each month I come to this cyber-space to reflect on something meaningful to me that also bears usefulness in terms of personal growth. I write with the intention of sharing from a deeply honest and unapologetic space inside my heart. So please, take what you wish and leave the rest.

In the time-honored classic The Bhagavad Gita, warrior hero Arjuna is faced with the difficult responsibility of protecting his kingdom in battle. What makes his predicament especially complex, is that the enemy happens to be his own family. 

 

In the story he is accompanied in his chariot by his trusted advisor Krishna, an Avatar of God. On the road to battle, Arjuna and Krishna discuss the moral dilemma the warrior is facing.

 

The big question for Arjuna is...

 

Am I making the right decision? 

Krishna explains that Arjuna must know himself before he can make the right decision. 

 

It is impossible to make critical life choices when we are distracted by the external world. Our minds become diluted with comparison, self-doubt, fear and resistance. 

Krishna says...

"It is better to strive in one's own dharma than to succeed in the dharma of another. Nothing is ever lost in following one's own dharma, but competition in another's dharma breeds fear and insecurity." 

Arjuna is a warrior. His life purpose (dharma) is to protect and fight for all sovereignty through battle. He is a symbol of the metaphorical battle that takes place within each of us.

 

Because sometimes, what is authentic, is neither convenient nor comfortable. On our path towards joy, we may go to battle with people we love. The Gita teaches that the only way out of conflict is through devotion to what is true for you. 

The right action, is the action that serves your higher self. And what is comfortable, is not always what is helpful. 

The warrior is the last one to pick up the weapon.  

With Love,

Morgan 

Art of Awe

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© 2020 by Morgan Kulas